Pyromania

Pyromania is an impulse control disorder in which individuals repeatedly fail to resist impulses to deliberately start fires, in order to relieve some tension or for instant gratification. The term pyromania comes from the Greek word πῦρ (pyr, fire).

 

Cluster Number:
Wiki Number: PW180
Diagnosis: Pyromania
US Patients:
World Patients:
Sex Ratio: M10;F
Age Onset:
Brain Area: impulse control;
Symptoms: setting fires to relieve own tension, not for vengance or profit, to induce euphoria and enjoy fire houses and fire-fighters
Progression:
Causes: fatherless homes light fires; parental neglect, fire lit as a stress reliever
Medications: Used for adults, resistant to therapy
Therapies: CBT, parental training and correcting assumptions; adults are usually less cooperative with CBT than children or teenagers

4 CURRENT ARTICLES
FROM PUBMED

The world-wide medical research
reports chosen for each diagnosis 

Clicking each title opens the
PubMed article’s summary-abstract.

  • The Adapted Firesetting Assessment Scale: reliability and validity
    by J Collins on May 27, 2022

    CONCLUSION: A larger study is needed to examine the factor structure of the AFAS.

  • Fire Walk With Me: Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Pyromania
    by David Potik on May 5, 2022

    Reports of destructive behavior by military personnel after demobilization have become more frequent; however, the pathways that might lead these individuals to commit such acts are not clear enough. This column presents the case of a retired soldier who reported the onset of pyromania after military service, and the relationship between dissociation and reenactment of the trauma is discussed. The main conclusions are that psychotherapy of traumatized patients should focus on helping them create...

  • Afterword: Beyond Diagnosis to Mourning and the Meaning of Symptoms
    by Eric M Plakun on May 5, 2022

    Reports of destructive behavior by military personnel after demobilization have become more frequent; however, the pathways that might lead these individuals to commit such acts are not clear enough. This column presents the case of a retired soldier who reported the onset of pyromania after military service, and the relationship between dissociation and reenactment of the trauma is discussed. The main conclusions are that psychotherapy of traumatized patients should focus on helping them create...

  • Pharmacotherapy of impulse control disorders: A systematic review
    by Talha Tahir on March 19, 2022

    There are currently no evidence-based treatment recommendations for impulse control disorders, which include intermittent explosive disorder (IED), kleptomania and pyromania. Therefore, this systematic review sought to identify all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that investigated pharmacological treatments for impulse control disorders, to evaluate their efficacy and tolerability. Searches were conducted within MEDLINE, PsychINFO, EMBASE, Web of Science, and Cochrane Central Register of...